Charleston

What is there to say about this young  man?  I am simply speechless.  It is hard to comment about a mentality which I find impossible  to understand.

Our latest young killer, the latest in a line of killers stretching back to Columbine, Virginia Tech, Aurora and Newtown is an avowed “white supremacist” – little different from what we used to call klansmen – or nazis.

In this respect he is different from the other killers – the anti-social “loners”  in black trench coats or he who dyed his hair red and called himself “the Joker” before shooting at the audience during the evening showing of “Batman”.    Or the supposedly “brilliant” young man, the “skinny goth” who, before killing 20 children and 6 teachers, and his mother, dressed all in black, “ninja” style.  This was life imitating art.

No.  Our latest young killer was going to do something because blacks were “raping our women” and “taking over” – taking over in South Carolina where the Confederate battle flag still has not been lowered over the state capitol and where our young man drives on roads named for Confederate generals.

He would be right at home in a hood or at the Wannsee Conference – but thanks to the educational system in America today he wouldn’t know anything about the Wannsee Conference.

On Facebook, our killer’s  profile is gothic dark, its singular politics racially suggestive.

The profile photo shows a skinny and pale young man, looking younger than his years,  glum and menacing, in a swamp alone,  his dark jacket bearing emblems popular with white supremacists.

They’re flags that flew over two African countries when they were ruled by whites, one from apartheid-era South Africa, the other from Rhodesia, now Zimbabwe.

Look at him.  He is trying so hard to look bad ass; clenching his jaw, scowling.   Trying so hard to look angry.   In fact, he looks like a kid with real problems.

Our young man was going to do something about the black menace; so he killed 9 unarmed black people including 6 women who welcomed him to their bible study group.  He did it after sitting with them; after they prayed.

Very brave.  Very brave indeed.

The gaping wound in the body America is racism.  It is there for all to see and is something we will not talk about.  It’s not new.  The wound has been festering for centuries.

In 1916 D. W. Griffith’s film “Birth of a Nation” was released and although controversial, became the biggest grossing silent film ever made.

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President Woodrow Wilson’s “History of the American People” was quoted in the film to describe how Northerners and blacks were using deception and abuse of power to “put the white South under the heal of the black South.”

Birth of a Nation describes Lincoln as having undermined state’s rights  creating an all powerful federal government in the process.  It depicted Northern blacks and freed slaves as villains bent on destroying white civilization through abuse of their new-found power after the Civil War.  The major villain of the film is a mulatto, a man of “mixed white and black race”.

Near the climax of the film, the white folk unite to save a town from “Negro anarchy”.   Yankees and rebels unite again in the “common defense of their Aryan birthright.”

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This kid could have written the movie script except that he is a high school drop out who spent too much time on social media, probably being influenced by one or more of the  18 white supremacist groups operating in South Carolina.  After all, would you know where to get the old South African and Rhodesian flags for your jacket?

Our previous young killers, it could at least be argued, might be mentally ill.  Finding our mass murderers  mentally ill neatly solves all of our problems. We don’t have to address gun violence, social media, video games, bullying, the eroticization of violence, loneliness and isolation.   Or racism.

They must be mentally ill otherwise he would be just like us.

We can’t seem to admit to ourselves that he is us. He is our son, the native son of 21st century America where we don’t care about anybody but us.

This is the “exceptional” society in which we live. We hear the cries of no one. We see the loneliness of no one. Most of us do not know nor care to know our neighbors living three houses away. It’s our dog eat dog, every man for himself country. We judge our communities by the quality of the lawns.  And we live in constant fear – of “terrorists”, our neighbors, the “other”.

We don’t give a rat’s ass if people are hungry, children die of malnutrition, veterans are living in our streets, most of the homeless are schizophrenic, that people die because of a lack of health care, or that we have spent a decade waging unjustified war against a couple of third world nations and have killed millions of Iraqis and Afghans.  Not to mention what we do elsewhere.

Our young killers are the symptoms of our societal illness.

The media and the toys, the politicians and Hollywood teach our children that real American heroes have no humanity.

When the lonely, isolated forgettable young man turns his guns on us, the ones we allowed him to acquire as is his NRA god-given right, why are we so surprised?

My sympathy to the families of those truly affected by this senseless violence. The rest of us can look in the mirror and take part of the blame.

.

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http://dailypostal.com/2015/06/18/dylann-roof-identified-as-suspect-in-south-carolina-church-shooting-video/

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About toritto

I was born during year four of the reign of Emperor Tiberius Claudius on the outskirts of the empire in Brooklyn. I married my high school sweetheart, the girl I took to the prom and we were together for forty years until her passing in 2004. We had four kids together and buried two together. I had a successful career in Corporate America (never got rich but made a living) and traveled the world. I am currently retired in the Tampa Bay metro area and live alone. One of my daughters is close by and one within a morning’s drive. They call their pops everyday. I try to write poetry (not very well), and about family. Occasionally I will try a historical piece relating to politics. :-)
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21 Responses to Charleston

  1. beetleypete says:

    We have had some examples of this ‘spree-killing’ (or whatever the latest name for it is) over here. Dunblane, where small schoolchildren were killed, and Hungerford, where a bitter man settled some family feuds, with others caught in the crossfire. We haven’t had the racist killings though, or the college-loner variety. Is it because we don’t have the same access to firearms? Almost certainly.

    We have our fair share of Anti-Semites, Muslim-haters, and Neo-Nazis. They might desecrate a grave, even punch or kick a person, but it mostly stops at that. I am sure that if they could easily (and legally) obtain firearms, they would use them to do much worse.

    Until your country abandons the gun-culture, glorified by many white and black Americans, this will continue to happen. Very sad indeed, more tragedy for innocent families.
    Regards from Norfolk. Pete.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. jmsabbagh says:

    Atrocious domestic terrorism,

    Like

  3. sojourner says:

    “The gaping wound in the body America is racism. It is there for all to see and is something we will not talk about. It’s not new. The wound has been festering for centuries.”

    You are so right, Frank!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. sojourner says:

    Reblogged this on An Outsider's Sojourn II and commented:
    “This is the ‘exceptional’ society in which we live. We hear the cries of no one. We see the loneliness of no one. Most of us do not know nor care to know our neighbors living three houses away. It’s our dog eat dog, every man for himself country. We judge our communities by the quality of the lawns. And we live in constant fear – of “terrorists”, our neighbors, the “other”.

    We don’t give a rat’s ass if people are hungry, children die of malnutrition, veterans are living in our streets, most of the homeless are schizophrenic, that people die because of a lack of health care, or that we have spent a decade waging unjustified war against a couple of third world nations and have killed millions of Iraqis and Afghans. Not to mention what we do elsewhere.

    Our young killers are the symptoms of our societal illness.”

    Like

  5. How very convenient that this story crowded out the more important news that the House passed the TPA (Trade Promotion Authority bill – aka also known as fast track authority for TPP) yesterday. There are a lot of unanswered questions about this incident, for example why the Huffington Post reported on the incident 2 days before it happened: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0QEuyXzgzmo&feature=youtu.be

    Like

  6. weggieboy says:

    I still feel numb. How many people have to die before America deals with its demons, among which racism and barely regulated possession of guns came together in one more tragedy? Prayers for the victims and families of the Charleston dead. RIP

    Like

  7. weggieboy says:

    Reblogged this on weggieboy's blog and commented:
    Too sad to write about. Please read what someone else had to say about the Charleston murders. I think toritto got it exactly rtght.

    Like

    • toritto says:

      Weggie – many thanks for the reblog. And yes, the crux of the problem is the easy availability of guns to virtually anyone. Regards.

      Like

      • Lavinia Ross says:

        The roots of social problems need to be addressed before this type of violence can truly be stopped. I grew up with a kid, the brother of one of my friends, who later on as an adult killed several others and himself at his place of work. I still can’t fathom what happened. As a small child, that kid could pick up a bumblebee and pet it. I grew up an moved away. The last I heard of him was the day of the shooting. Every day presents a set of choices, provided by circumstance, that determine the path one takes in life.

        Like

  8. sunsetdragon says:

    I have no words at all as my heart is overwhelmed with the sadness and loss of this entire thing, and my mind simply can not wrap itself around the fact that someone would do this.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. maggie0019 says:

    What a well written blog. And what a horrible tragedy. We are trying to digest it all, but it’s difficult to wrap one’s mind around so much hate. 😦 All our love and sympathy to the victims and their families.

    Like

  10. jfwknifton says:

    I could write a thousand blog posts and never come anywhere near achieving anything as powerful as what you have written here, As an English outsider, I would say that as your first step you clearly need to stop making guns available to madmen, but the problem is presumably that somebody with a lot of influence clearly makes a lot of money from doing this.

    Like

    • toritto says:

      Thank you John. High praise indeed coming from a man of letters. How then will I get my hat on today?

      🙂

      And yes indeed – the gun manufacturers and the National Rifle Association are the core of the issue. I put down my weapon after four years service in 1967. I have not touched a gun since. I have never owned a gun and am proud to say my children have never touched guns either.

      Regards,

      Frank

      Like

  11. Debunker says:

    Good post, as usual! I think the one thing all these people have in common, regardless of their supposed intention or ideology, is simple vanity. They have no creativity, no talent, and their only way to get noticed is by murdering innocent people. You only have to look at that idiot Anders Breivik and the various posed photographs he had taken of himself looking like a Field Marshall in the Ruritanian army. Quite pathetic …

    Like

  12. Susan P says:

    I am still boggled. Where will this end?

    Like

  13. tubularsock says:

    Exceptionally well written but Tubularsock doesn’t have to pay attention because we live in one of those post-racial societies. The solution to the gun issue is more guns. Yes, if pastors, teachers, and doctors were armed with Uzis all this would be taken care of because we’d be protected by the intellectuals of our society. And a smart shooter would lead the nation to victory! It’s so easy with an Uzi!

    Like

  14. dougstuber says:

    It’s great you never said his name. Maybe a good idea to also take the photo out too?

    Like

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